THE POSTWAR BOOM AND THE COLD WAR YEARS

Tìm thấy 10,000 tài liệu liên quan tới từ khóa "THE POSTWAR BOOM AND THE COLD WAR YEARS":

Coming to terms with the past in postwar literature and philosophy

COMING TO TERMS WITH THE PAST IN POSTWAR LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY

developments and to wonder about issues of being and essence, butthey remained largely insensitive, publicly, to the wrongs committed bytheir nation during the Third Reich. Recognising the tendency in theFederal Republic to deny or minimise past wrongs, Adorno ascribes it toa psychic mechanism of repression. Similarly Alexander and MargaretheMitscherlich analysed Die Unf¨ahigkeit zu trauern (; The inability to mourn)as a collective German neurosis. Neither Adorno nor the Mitscherlichs,however, recommend traditional Enlightenment to alleviate anti-Semiticsentiments in postwar Germany. Rather, they advocate a programmethat will strengthen subjectivity so that individuals can resist fascistideology.The turning point for German prose literature on the issue of comingto terms with the past occurred with the publication of G¨unter Grass’sDie Blechtrommel (; The tin drum), a novel that also put Germany onthe map again in world literary circles. Grass belongs to the generationof writers and intellectuals that have contributed most to the moral con-sensus that developed around Nazism and the Holocaust. Born in ,Grass and all his generation spent their formative years under NationalSocialism and fought in the war, but because of their youth were rarelyin positions of responsibility. When they emerged as young men andwomen, the more reflective among them endeavoured to account andatone for the crimes committed by Hitler’s Germany. After the war Grass Robert C. Holubstudied art at the D¨usseldorf Academy, and began also to composepoems, short prose pieces and plays, but although encouraged by mem-bers of the Gruppe , his initial efforts achieved only modest success. DieBlechtrommel was a phenomenal breakthrough, and Grass has been oneof the focal points of the German literary scene ever since. Katz und Maus(; Cat and mouse) and Hundejahre (; Dog years) followed quickly afterDie Blechtrommel, and the three works, which are set in Grass’s birthplace,
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structural levels of the iliad

STRUCTURAL LEVELS OF THE ILIAD

war of Athena and Hera versus Aphrodite had Zeus so caught up in it thathe did not want the social war to end. A god in the universal war onceagain created the social war between Troy and Greece. The universalwar was the cause of the social war of Greece and Troy. The privatewar of Achilles' honor was an outgrowth of the social war between theGreeks and the Trojans. During the social war, Apollo grew angry at theGreeks for the abuse of his priest, Chryses. The Greeks had abusedChryses when Agamemnon took Chryses' daughter, Chryseis, duringthe raid of the town of Thebes. Agamemnon wanted a replacement forChryseis, so he took Briseis from Achilles. This deeply wounded thehonor of Achilles, and he decided to stop fighting in the social war untilhis honor was amended. Achilles was angered by an event that occurredin the social war, thus providing the need for Achilles to reclaim his honor. The social war was the cause of the private war of Achilles. Theopportunity for Achilles to carry out his private war came after the deathof his comrade, Patroclus. Because Achilles would not fight, Patroclusasked him if he could wear his armor. Patroclus thought that this mightmake others think he was Achilles, so that the Trojans might be scaredand the Greeks might gain courage and confidence. Achilles consented,and during the ensuing battle Patroclus was killed by Hector. Achillesnow had a way to go out and fight gloriously, in order to avengePatroclus' death as well as to mend his honor that was so wounded bythe ransack of Briseis. The social war then influenced the outcome of theprivate war of Achilles. Events that occurred in the social war created andinfluence the private war of Achilles to reclaim his honor. Theuniversal war of the gods was deeply impacted by the private war ofAchilles. In some instances, the private war of Achilles fueled theuniversal war of the gods. An example of this was when Achilles waskilling Trojans left and right in the river Scamandros. All of the deadTrojans in the water made Scamandros angry, and he chased Achilles
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Gale Encyclopedia Of American Law 3Rd Edition Volume 10 P32 ppsx

GALE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF AMERICAN LAW 3RD EDITION VOLUME 10 P32 PPSX

tion defined its enemy narrowly: Osama binLaden and his aides. Osama bin Laden wasknown to be living under the protection of therepressive Muslim regime known as the Talibanin Afghanistan. Although the Clinton adminis-tration adopted a hostile attitude toward theTaliban, it did not make Afghanistan or theTaliban government a target of its efforts tocombat the bin Laden terrorism threat.From 1998 to 2000, President Clintonpursued a policy of economic sanctions againstthe Taliban and sent numerous messages to theDE FACTO government of Afghanistan demandingthat it deliver bin Laden for trial in the UnitedStates. The Clinton administration quicklybecame frustrated by the Taliban’s lack ofcooperation. Although the administration de-liberately raised the specter of military confron-tation, it ultimately chose to step back for avariety of reasons, not the least of which was thedelicate negotiations between Israel and thePalestinians.GEORGE W. BUSH was elected president andtook office in January 2001. Just eight monthslater came the devastating September 11thattacks. Bush’s reaction was swift and decisive.When it became clear that bin Laden was theprobable instigator of the attacks, Bush deliv-ered an ultimatum to the Taliban to turn overbin Laden or face the might of the U.S. military.
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ALAN GREENSPAN THE AGE OF TURBULENCE ppt

ALAN GREENSPAN THE AGE OF TURBULENCE PPT

Lindsey put forward the idea that as the terrorists had dealt a blow to American confidence, the best way to counter it would be a tax cut. He and others argued for pumping about $100 billion into the economy as soon as possible. The number didn't alarm me—it was about 1 percent of the coun-try's total annual output. But I told them we had no way of knowing yet whether $100 billion was too much or too little. Yes, the airlines and the tourism industries had been severely impacted, and the newspapers were full of stories about all sorts of layoffs. Yet on Monday, September 17, amaz-ingly, the New York Stock Exchange had succeeded in reopening just three blocks from Ground Zero. It was an important step because it brought a sense of normalcy back to the system—a bright spot in the picture we were still piecing together at the Fed. At the same time, the check payment sys-tem was recovering, and the stock market hadn't crashed: prices had merely gone down and then stabilized, an indication that most companies were not in serious trouble. I told them the prudent course was to continue to work on options and meet back in two weeks, when we'd know more. 7 THE AGE OF TURBULENCE I delivered the same message the next morning to a public hearing of the Senate Banking Committee, counseling patience: "Nobody has the capacity to fathom fully how the tragedy of September 11 will play out. But in the weeks ahead, as the shock wears off, we should be able to better gauge how the ongoing dynamics of these events are shaping the immediate economic outlook." I also emphasized, "Over the past couple of decades, the Ameri-can economy has become increasingly resilient to shocks. Deregulated fi-nancial markets, far more flexible labor markets, and, more recently, the major advances in information technology have enhanced our ability to ab-sorb disruptions and recover." In fact, I was putting a better face on the situation than I feared might be the case. Like most people in government, I fully expected more attacks.
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100 CÂU BÀI TẬP CHIA ĐỘNG TỪ

100 CÂU BÀI TẬP CHIA ĐỘNG TỪ

this corner yesterday.74. Mr Jone ( be ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . principal of out school since last year75. Violets ( bloom ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . in Spring76. We ( not live ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . in England for 2 years now.77. I ( never forget ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . what you ( just tell ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . me.78. They ( prepare ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . the Christmas dinner at the moment.79. When I last ( stay ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . in Cairo, I ( ride ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . to the Pyramids on a camel that my friend ( borrow ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . the day before.80. Geoge ( work ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . at the university so far.81. I see that Tom ( write ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . his composition82. He says that he ( look ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . for a job next week83. They think he ( be ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . here last night.84. He tells us that he ( be ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . to the mountains before.85. He wants to do it before his father ( come ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . 86. The student who answered the question ( be ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . John.87. This is the house that Jack ( build ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . 3 years ago.88. Mary ( have ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . dinner when her friend called.89. I’ll wait until he ( finish ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . his novel90. When you ( come ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . back, he already ( buy ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . a new house91. Don’t come until I ( finish ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . lunch92. I ( hope ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . it ( stop ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . raining by 5 o’clock this afternoon93. The river ( not begin ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . to swell until some rain ( fall ). . . . . . . . .. . . . 94. By next month I ( leave ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . for India.95. The film ( end ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . by the time we ( get ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . there96. They ( build ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . a house by june next year97. I ( give ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . her your letter when I ( see ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . her tomorrow.
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Tài liệu Đề thi và đáp án tiếng anh trình độ A - Đề 17 potx

TÀI LIỆU ĐỀ THI VÀ ĐÁP ÁN TIẾNG ANH TRÌNH ĐỘ A - ĐỀ 17 POTX

(A) the most(B) very much(C) much more(D) the more16. - You look tired. - Well it was ________ that I feel like going to bed. (A) so long test(B) very long test(C) a long test(D) such a long test17. After years of war the whole nation wanted to make ________ with their enemies. (A) peace(B) pace(C) pact(D) pair18. The thief was ________ to six months imprisonment. CCDAA12345678910

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the university of north carolina press fall-out shelters for the human spirit american art and the cold war jun 2005

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS FALL-OUT SHELTERS FOR THE HUMAN SPIRIT AMERICAN ART AND THE COLD WAR JUN 2005

socioeconomic status, perceived degree of friendliness toward America,and even, on occasion, artistic tastes. And they always made clear theirgoals for the art. It might be to deliver a simple message about America’sdedication to cultural a√airs. For Eastern Europe, the exhibitions mightbe designed to send a more powerful message about personal and politi-cal freedom. An exhibit in Africa, on the other hand, might be set up tostress issues of racial equality and civil rights for the African Americanpopulation.Yet, to focus entirely on the government’s goals, the government’sintentions, and the government’s involvement in the international pro-gram is to ignore the fact that for many private individuals and organiza-tions in the United States art was viewed as the best and brightest hopefor bringing understanding to a world in chaos, peace to a world on theverge of war, and a sense of kinship to peoples divided by walls andpolitical ideologies. They viewed their mission of sending U.S. art abroad,to a large degree, as above the political and military jousting between Eastand West. Their battle was a larger one and, to them at least, much more8INTRODUCTIONcrucial. Leaders, ideologies, even nations might rise and fall, come andgo, but the human spirit must endure and progress. Their pleas likelystrike the scholar of Cold War diplomacy, whether realist or revisionist,as hopelessly naïve, as impossibly idealistic. However, they represent astrain of thinking during the Cold War that is often ignored in the race tofind the ways in which that conflict shaped, or mangled, or destroyedaspects of American culture. The Cold War was indeed a powerful force,but it was not omnipotent—there were survivors, people and ideas whotried to find (and occasionally found) shelter from the political andideological storms. Today, in a world where chaos has actually evolvedinto a theory, in which a ‘‘new war’’ has been declared, and where new
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INTERNATIONAL CAPITAL FLOWS AND BOOM-BUST CYCLES IN THE ASIA PACIFIC REGION +

INTERNATIONAL CAPITAL FLOWS AND BOOM BUST CYCLES IN THE ASIA PACIFIC REGION

4in our models. In particular, we investigate whether the estimated capital flow shocks are driven by exogenous economic events and correlated across countries. Section 5 concludes the paper. 2. Theoretical Overview This section explains different theories on the effects of economic integration on the symmetry of business cycles and documents empirical studies on this issue.7 Financial market integration can decrease co-movements of output by increasing industrial specialization (Kalemli-Ozcan et al. 2001). Countries with integrated international financial markets can ensure against country-specific shocks through portfolio diversification; therefore such countries can afford to have a specialized production structure. That is, financial market integration allows firms to take full advantage of comparative advantage and engage in production specialization, which in turn increases the asymmetry of output as long as industry-specific shocks exist. Heathcote and Perri (2002) analyzed the same issue from a different angle. They noted a significant drop in the cross-country correlation of output in the 1990s and argued that the drop was due to a decrease in cross-country correlation of productivity shocks combined with increased financial market integration. Degree of financial market integration endogenously and positively responds to the correlation of shocks. That is, as productivity shocks become less correlated, potential welfare gains from portfolio diversification increase, as does the degree of financial market integration. However, countries with liberalized capital accounts can be significantly more synchronized, even though they are more specialized (Imbs, 2003). A large body of literature on contagion argues that capital flows in different countries, in particular developing countries in the same region, are synchronized through various channels of financial contagion including herd behavior, information asymmetry, etc. (Calvo and Mendoza, 2000; Mendoza, 2001). International investors may classify different countries in a single group and make region-based
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the data warehousing ebusiness dba handbook

THE DATA WAREHOUSING EBUSINESS DBA HANDBOOK

No eDBA Is an Island 203 viii The Data Warehousing eBusiness DBA Handbook Conventions Used in this Book It is critical for any technical publication to follow rigorous standards and employ consistent punctuation conventions to make the text easy to read. However, this is not an easy task. Within Oracle there are many types of notation that can confuse a reader. Some Oracle utilities such as STATSPACK and TKPROF are always spelled in CAPITAL letters, while Oracle parameters and procedures have varying naming conventions in the Oracle documentation. It is also important to remember that many Oracle commands are case sensitive, and are always left in their original executable form, and never altered with italics or capitalization. Hence, all Rampant TechPress books follow these conventions: Parameters - All Oracle parameters will be lowercase italics. Exceptions to this rule are parameter arguments that are commonly capitalized (KEEP pool, TKPROF), these will be left in ALL CAPS. Variables – All PL/SQL program variables and arguments will
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Level A lesson 17 pptx

LEVEL A LESSON 17 PPTX

(A) the most (B) very much (C) much more (D) the more 16. - You look tired. - Well it was ________ that I feel like going to bed. D(A) so long test (B) very long test (C) a long test (D) such a long test 17. After years of war the whole nation wanted to make ________ with their enemies. A(A) peace (B) pace (C) pact (D) pair 18. The thief was ________ to six months imprisonment. A(A) sentenced (B) given (C) sent (D) charged 19. - Do you like your new job? - Yes, but my employer insists that I ________ on time. C(A) was (B) am (C) be

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THE DEATH OF RUSSIAN CINEMA, OR SOCHI: RUSSIA’S LAST RESORT ppt

THE DEATH OF RUSSIAN CINEMA, OR SOCHI: RUSSIA’S LAST RESORT PPT

imagination. It was a calculated risk that, in the popular imagination, the pre- 20 revolutionary past was indeed that coveted alloy, both worldly and deeply national. Moreover, the grand, imperial style portrayed in these nostalgic films conferred on the newly wealthy a mantle of legitimacy that it sorely needed. Yet the films’ long, convoluted plots and lagging pace were, as the commissars used to say, “out of step” with the world of cellular phones. These screen adaptations failed in all but one spectacular instance: Lev Tolstoy’s “Prisoner of the Caucasus” became Sergei Bodrov’s Prisoner of the Mountains. In a culture allergic to socialism’s Happy End, today’s viewers are equally skeptical of capitalist Happy Ends, a contrived “result” of hard work, a clear conscience, and a good heart. Instead, directors often portray a character’s good luck as simply miraculous, as in Murad Ibragimbekov’s wry Man for a Young Woman or Vilen Novak’s melodramatic A Princess Who Lives on Beans. In a culture where full-tort auto insurance is a dashboard icon and a gun, and where film production studios are named Chance and Talisman, happiness is an even more mystical notion than it is in the West. Ultimately, cinema’s showy props and stories of inexplicable luck have to do an anxiety about social mobility, about who will have access to the dream of well-being, and what ethical compromises are required to obtain it. The paradox is that film characters are extremely rich or poor precisely at a time when the Russian middle-class is emerging as a recognizable entity with its own lifestyle and consumer choices. Perhaps this is why contemporary—rather than historical melodrama has been the most successful genre of recent Russian film. Drawing on a tradition that includes Petr Todorovsky’s 1989 Intergirl, Vasilii Pichul’s 1988 Little Vera, contemporary melodrama provides a glimpse into the anguished conflicts of the propertied class, set 21 against a surplus of consumer goods and interior decoration. However unrealistically, upwardly mobile Russians can picture themselves reflected back on the screen in a
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Level A lesson 46 docx

LEVEL A LESSON 46 DOCX

Level A lesson 46 1. My father is a doctor. Lan’s father is a doctor, too. They are ………. doctors. BA. not B. bothor C. or D. and 2. Oh, look at that cat. ………. is very nice …… tail is very long and nice. BA. It / It’s B. It / Its C. It’s / Its D. It / It 3. This is our classroom, not Bob’s. …………. classroom is over there. ……… isn’t in the classroom now. DA. His / He’s B. His / His C. He’s / His D. His / He 4. These are Bob and Boom. These books are not ………… . ……… are in the desk. DA. their / Theirs B. their / Them C. theirs / Their D. theirs / Theirs 5. ………… house is big but ……… is small. A
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WOMEN AND THE CIVIL WAR THE CIVIL WAR A NATION DIVIDED 2

WOMEN AND THE CIVIL WAR THE CIVIL WAR A NATION DIVIDED 2

volunteer group.and toiled there, the majority of them on the region’s vastcotton plantations. During the presidential campaign of 1860,­Republican candidate Abraham Lincoln of Illinois had calledAmerican Women Confront the Civil Warfor an end to the expansion of slavery within U.S. territory,although he promised not to interfere with slavery in thosestates where human bondage already was established. Whenthe results of the November election were tallied, it was discovered that Lincoln had carried every Northern state exceptfor one and not a single Southern state. The war that eruptedbetween North and South just five months after the electionwas sparked by Southern suspicions that, despite his campaign pledge, Lincoln intended to abolish slavery throughoutthe United States. It was a move many white Southerners believed would destroy their ­cotton-­based economy and entireway of life.By the time of Lincoln’s inauguration on March 4, 1861,seven Southern ­ states—­South Carolina, Florida, Mississippi,Georgia, Louisiana, Alabama, and ­Texas—­already had seceded,or withdrawn, from the Union. They declared themselves theindependent Confederate States of America, with Mississippipolitician Jefferson Davis as their president. On April 12 of thatyear, South Carolina militiamen seized the Union’s Fort Sumterin Charleston.Absolutely committed to restoring the fractured Union,Lincoln asked the states to provide 75,000 volunteers to putdown what he referred to as the Confederate “insurrection,”or rebellion. Lincoln’s call to arms was greeted enthusiastically
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Three Years After - Next Steps in the War on Terror potx

THREE YEARS AFTER - NEXT STEPS IN THE WAR ON TERROR POTX

Koran and during centuries of tribal warfare since, Jihadist tactics call for isolated raids, notsustained large-scale operations or long military campaigns. The idea is to lie in wait, attackthe enemy when he is inattentive, beleaguer him, make his life untenable. Showmanship incarrying out attacks demonstrates prowess.For the Jihadist, fighting is a religious obligation. Strength in battle comes from re-ligious conviction, not weapons. Combat is an opportunity to demonstrate one’s beliefthrough courage and sacrifice. Heroism is more important than the outcome. Those whosacrifice all are not only to be extolled but will be rewarded in Paradise. Fighting benefits theJihadist individually and morally.Of course, none of this means that there are not debates among Jihadists. There aredifferences:• Should they concentrate on local conflict or join up with al Qaeda?• Should they lie low to rebuild?• Was it wise to launch a terrorist campaign in Saudi Arabia?• How acceptable are collateral Muslim casualties?• Should the heretical Shia be enlisted or attacked?• Are kidnappings, or taking children hostage as in Russia, counterproductive?To build an Army of Believers, Jihadists consider recruiting as an end in itself, notsimply to serve operational needs. Recruiting is decentralized and continuous in an effort tospread Jihadist ideology. The themes emphasized in recruiting efforts are the suffering of thedevout, the atrocities committed against Muslims, the injustice of the situation in Muslimcommunities, the humiliation inflicted on the faithful. Recruiting stresses the opportunitiesto take action against these wrongs. And Jihadist recruitment offers spiritual rewards.Recruitment is a multistage self-presentation process in which volunteers must dem-onstrate increasing commitment to the Jihadist cause. This commitment leads the recruitthrough successive oaths and into the secret inner circles. Since the end of al Qaeda’s sanctu-ary in Afghanistan, the constant talent hunt for volunteers with specialized skills has beendecentralized.Reconnaissance of targets and planning to carry out attacks are also continuous ac-tivities. Planning itself is considered a way to participate in Jihad. Plans are surrogate opera-
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Tài liệu 570 IELTS academic words-part 9 ppt

TÀI LIỆU 570 IELTS ACADEMIC WORDS-PART 9 PPT

I could only devote two hours a day to the work. She devoted herself to her career. • devotion Diminish: (~decrease ) Giảm bớt, hạ bớt Your pain should diminish gradually after taking these tablets. His influence has diminished with time. Our efforts were producing diminishing returns (= we achieved less although we spent more time or money). • diminution / • undiminished Distort: Bóp méo, xuyên tạc My original statement has been completely distorted by the media. The loudspeaker seemed to distort his voice. • distortion Duration: Thời gian, khoảng thời gian (tồn tại của một sự việc) A contract of three years' duration The school was used as a hospital for the duration of the war. The singer remained in the hotel for the duration of his stay in the UK. Erode: (~wear away) Xói mòn, ăn mòn The coastline is slowly being eroded by the sea. The rocks have eroded away over time. • erosion Nhóm 9 ðinh Nho Hiệp – ddinhnhohiep@gmail.com - 5 -
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461 HISTORY

461 HISTORY

I. Fill in the gaps with the following words:III.Read the text on Slavery and find synonyms for thefollowing words and expressions:president ,reason, soldier(s), plantation(s), people, history, placedifferent_________accepted__________went on ___________The American Civil WarThis took 1 ________between 1861 and 1865 and was a war betweenthe Northern States (the Union) and the Southern States (the Confederacy)of the United States of America. The 2_________ was that the Northernerswith their leader Abraham Lincoln, wanted all the 3 __________ to be free.The Southerners, however wanted the black people to work as slaves in their4 _______________..The war, where Americns fought Americans, was the deadliest inAmerican 5 _________. In the four years it lasted, more than 600,0006_____________died. Finally, the Union won the war, ending the slavery of black people inAmerica and Abraham Lincoln became 7 _________ of the United States in1865.II. Complete the text with the Present Simple form of theverbs in brackets:The Mississippi RiverThe Mississippi River___________(begin) at Lake Itaska, high in themountains of Minnesota, and___________ (run) 2,320 miles (3,734km) down
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AMY FOSTER

AMY FOSTER

never showed a desire for conversation, and, as it seemed to me, she did not know how to smile. Sometimes of a fine Sunday afternoon she would put on her best dress, a pair of stout boots, a large grey hat trimmed with a black feather (I've seen her in that finery), seize an absurdly slender parasol, climb over two stiles, tramp over three fields and along two hundred yards of road--never further. There stood Foster's cottage. She would help her mother to give their tea to the younger children, wash up the crockery, kiss the little ones, and go back to the farm. That was all. All the rest, all the change, all the relaxation. She never seemed to wish for anything more. And then she fell in love. She fell in love silently, obstinately--perhaps helplessly. It came slowly, but when it came it worked like a powerful spell; it was love as the Ancients understood it: an irresistible and fateful impulse-- a possession! Yes, it was in her to become haunted and possessed by a face, by a presence, fatally, as though she had been a pagan worshipper of form under a joyous sky--and to be awakened at last from that mysterious forgetfulness of self, from that enchantment, from that transport, by a fear resembling the unaccountable terror of a brute. . . ." With the sun hanging low on its western limit, the expanse of the grass-lands framed in the counter-scarps of the rising ground took on a gorgeous and sombre aspect. A sense of penetrating sad- ness, like that inspired by a grave strain of music, disengaged itself from the silence of the fields. The men we met walked past slow, unsmiling, with downcast eyes, as if the melancholy of an over-burdened earth had weighted their feet, bowed their shoulders, borne down their glances. "Yes," said the doctor to my remark, "one would think the earth is under a curse, since of all her children these that cling to her the closest are uncouth in body and as leaden of gait as if their very hearts were loaded with chains. But here on this same road you might have seen amongst these heavy men a being lithe, supple, and long-limbed, straight like a pine with something striving upwards in his appearance as though the heart within him had been buoyant. Perhaps it was only the force of the contrast, but when he was passing one of these villagers here, the soles of his feet did not seem to me to touch the dust of the road. He vaulted over the stiles, paced these slopes with a long elastic stride that made him noticeable at a great distance, and had lustrous black
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Chapter 055. Immunologically Mediated Skin Diseases (Part 9) doc

CHAPTER 055 IMMUNOLOGICALLY MEDIATED SKIN DISEASES PART 9

Chapter 055. Immunologically Mediated Skin Diseases (Part 9) Figure 55-6 Discoid lupus erythematosus. Violaceous, hyperpigmented, atrophic plaques, often with evidence of follicular plugging, which may result in scarring, are characteristic of discoid lupus erythematosus (also called chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus). Scleroderma and Morphea The skin changes of scleroderma (Chap. 316) usually begin on the hands, feet, and face, with episodes of recurrent nonpitting edema. Sclerosis of the skin begins distally on the fingers (sclerodactyly) and spreads proximally, usually accompanied by resorption of bone of the fingertips, which may have punched out ulcers, stellate scars, or areas of hemorrhage (Fig. 55-7). The fingers may actually shrink in size and become sausage-shaped, and since the fingernails are usually unaffected, the nails may curve over the end of the fingertips. Periungual telangiectases are usually present, but periungual erythema is rare. In advanced cases, the extremities show contractures and calcinosis cutis. Facial involvement includes a smooth, unwrinkled brow, taut skin over the nose, shrinkage of tissue around the mouth, and perioral radial furrowing (Fig. 55-8). Matlike telangiectases are often present, particularly on the face and hands. Involved skin feels indurated, smooth, and bound to underlying structures; hyperpigmentation and hypopigmentation are also often present. Raynaud's phenomenon, i.e., cold-induced blanching, cyanosis, and reactive hyperemia, is present in almost all patients and can precede development of scleroderma by many years. The combination of calcinosis cutis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia has been termed the CREST syndrome. Anticentromere antibodies have been reported in a very high percentage of
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Tài liệu Changes in Business Cycles: Evidence and Explanations ppt

TÀI LIỆU CHANGES IN BUSINESS CYCLES EVIDENCE AND EXPLANATIONS PPT

policy at present should be sufficiently stimulative to foster moderate growth in realeconomic activity” (Board of Governors, 1970, p. 149). Similarly, in July 1982, theFOMC said that it wanted “to provide sufficient monetary growth to encouragerecovery in economic activity over the months ahead” (Board of Governors, 1982,pp. 109–110).Our study also looked at the effects of discretionary policy in years other thanthose following troughs. The findings concerning the general effects of discretion-ary policy are summarized in Figure 2. The solid line shows the actual change inreal GDP and the dotted line shows the estimated change under neutral policy,which is defined in this case to be no change in either the real federal funds rateor in the ratio of the high-employment surplus to GDP.13The fact that the dottedline is often below the solid line on downticks suggests that policy was counteringsome periods of low or falling output. Furthermore, there are some periods ofrobust expansion, such as the early 1960s and the early to mid-1990s, which in theabsence of policy would have been episodes of very low growth. This suggests thatpolicy may have prevented some recessions or near-recessions in the postwar era.13Other plausible specifications of neutral policy yield similar results. The original calculations werebased on quarterly data. To increase legibility, I have converted the estimates to annual values bysumming the quarterly changes over each year.36 Journal of Economic PerspectivesThis sense that policy has counteracted some postwar shocks is borne out bydetailed case studies. For example, Bernanke (1990) argues that interest rate cutsand other actions by the Federal Reserve following the stock market crash of 1987prevented a significant financial crisis and the real contraction that would likelyhave resulted. While these monetary actions were too short-lived to show up inFigure 2, Bernanke is convincing that they had a substantial beneficial effect.The same methods described above to look at the contribution of discretionary
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Đề thi tham khảo Môn: Anh Văn – Mã đề 026 docx

ĐỀ THI THAM KHẢO MÔN: ANH VĂN – MÃ ĐỀ 026 DOCX

c. ignored d. avoided > c 16. …………… the 35 years between the end of the Civil War and the turn of the century, the population of the United States doubled, and manufacturing production increased seven-fold. a. Into b. In c. At d. To  b 17. Would you mind standing for me and teach my French class tomorrow afternoon, Jean? a. up b. down c. out d. in >d 18. "Can I help you?" "Yes. I'm keen buying some flour." a. in b. on c. for d. by  b 19. To be a good guitarist, you must for an hour or more every day. a. prepare b. repeat c. practise d. instruct
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