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1000 PHRASAL VERBS IN CONTEXT

1000 PHRASAL VERBS IN CONTEXT

81000 Phrasal Verb Quiz Questions A aComplete the sentences so that each includes a phrasal verb beginning with ‘a’...1 We’ll have to account _ _ _ the missing money somehow.2 Maria sometimes has to _ _ _ as our babysitter as well as our maid.3 You should act _ _ your doctor’s advice to eat more fruit and vegetables.4 My printer was _ _ _ _ _ _ up so I had to get it fixed.5 A good light show adds a lot _ _ the excitement of a rock concert.6 I don’t believe his story. It just doesn’t add _ _ .7 The electricity and telephone bills _ _ _ up to $325.00.8 The ads for the new jeans are aimed _ _ teenagers.9 Don’t forget to _ _ _ _ _ enough time for traffic jams on the way to the airport.10 Having one book published doesn’t really amount _ _ a career as a writer.11 He got into trouble for answering _ _ _ _ to his teacher.12 The Red Cross had to appeal _ _ _ more money to help people after the earthquake.13 Our new line of watches is designed to _ _ _ _ _ _ to young professional people.14 The tax increases only _ _ _ _ _ to people in the top income brackets.15 We arrived _ _ our conclusions after studying all the evidence.16 I got an email from Mark and he _ _ _ _ _ after you, so I said you were fine.17 If you get lost, _ _ _ someone for directions.18 If you like her, you should ask her _ _ _ on a date.19 We’re going to _ _ _ some friends over for dinner tomorrow night.20 You shouldn’t attach any importance _ _ what people say when they’ve been drinking.21 She has to _ _ _ _ _ _ to two customers at once if there aren’t enough sales staff.22 Her income depends on sales of her books, but it averages _ _ _ at about $10,000 a month.1000 Phrasal Verbs In Context © Matt Errey 2007www.teflgames.com/phrasal_verbs.html
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1000 PHRASAL VERBS IN CONTEXT

1000 PHRASAL VERBS IN CONTEXT

Cuốn sách này giúp bạn học 1000 phrasal verbs cơ bản nhất trong Tiếng Anh. Sách đưa ra các phrasal verbs trong ngữ cảnh nên rất dễ hiểu, dễ nhớ. Ngoài ra, có bài tập kèm theo đáp án sau mỗi bài học giúp luyện tập các phrasal verbs vừa học. Cuốn sách rất cần thiết với các em học sinh PTTH đang chuẩn bị cho kỳ thi ĐH, và cũng rất bổ ích với các bạn đang ôn luyện IELTS TOEFL.

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TALKALOT INTERMEDIATE BOOK 1 EAT UP YOUR PHRASAL VERBS SAMPLE ANSWERS

TALKALOT INTERMEDIATE BOOK 1 EAT UP YOUR PHRASAL VERBS SAMPLE ANSWERS

Talk a LotIntermediate Book 1Eat Up Your Phrasal Verbs – They’re Good for You!Sample AnswersFor the first part of this set of sample answers I have chosen a group of eight phrasal verbs atrandom from Unit 2: Problems. They are:break up take out fit in make up sign on stand up to long for give upIt goes without saying that a good dictionary – and even a good dictionary of phrasal verbs, ifpossible – will be an invaluable companion for students during this activity.Pick a Group of Phrasal Verbs:Meaning and ContextThese activities are done by the students, with the teacher checking their results. There areno sample answers to record.Form1. Group the phrasal verbs by connecting sounds: (cv), (vc), (vv), or (cc).cv:cc:cv and cc:break up, fit in, sign on, take out, make up, give uplong forstand up to2. Put all of the transitive* phrasal verbs into a group. (*pv’s that take an object)3. Put all of the intransitive* phrasal verbs into a group. (*pv’s that don’t take an object)4. Put all of the separable* phrasal verbs into a group. (*trans. pv’s that take an objectbefore or after the particle)5. Put all of the inseparable* phrasal verbs into a group. (*trans. pv’s that take an objectafter the particle only)Students can check their answers to these questions against the table of phrasal verbs on
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PHRASAL VERBS ENGLISH GRAMMAR

PHRASAL VERBS ENGLISH GRAMMAR

Phrasal verbsHere are some common phrasal verbs in English.Screw upWhen something screws up somebody, it confuses or hurts them.Scratch outTo scratch out is to make a living with great difficulty.Seal offTo seal off an area is to block it or prevent access to it.Set offTo set off is to start a journey.Shake offTo shake something off is to get rid of it.Spruce upTo spruce up is to smarten up.Splash outTo splash out is to spend a lot of money on somethingStick aroundTo stick around is to stay in the same place for a long time.Dish outTo dish out is to give something (usually criticism) in large amountsSpew out
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20 BASIC ENGLISH PHRASAL VERBS MIXED TENSES 2

20 BASIC ENGLISH PHRASAL VERBS MIXED TENSES 2

English Banana.comTest Your Grammar Skills20 Basic English Phrasal Verbs – Mixed Tenses 2Complete the sentences below with one of these basic phrasal verbs in the most suitableform:get upput onget inpick upstand uplie downtake offget output downsit downswitch onget oncome intake awaygo intoswitch offget offgo outbring backcome out of1. Would you mind _______________ your high heels indoors, please?2. Trevor _______________ early today because he wanted to go jogging.

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33884 PHRASAL VERB BOARD GAME AND ROLE PLAY

33884 PHRASAL VERB BOARD GAME AND ROLE PLAY

FinishRole-PlayAct out the following dialogues. Do not write anything down. Try to use all the phrasal verbs inyour conversation. Then present one dialogue to the class.---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1. You had a fight with a friend and want to be friends again. Call her to talk about it.Use:work outthink throughcount onmake uptear upcall up---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------2. You’re a parent. Your 16 year old teenager came home at 2 am. You are upset.Ask him/her where they went.Use:take offturn/show upcount onput off (coming home)make up---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------3. You are married. Your husband/wife talked too much and now you have a $300cell phone bill. Talk to him/her.Use:do withoutput up withturn upgo over
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46474 PHRASAL VERBS RELATING TO CLOTHES

46474 PHRASAL VERBS RELATING TO CLOTHES

Phrasal Verbs Relating to ClothesCircle the phrasal verbs in the following sentences:Childrenoften wearout theirclothes.1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10.11.12.I think I need to go on a diet. I can’t get into my jeans.These jeans are too small for me. I’ll give them away to my friend.Do these shoes go with this dress?I’m looking for my slippers. Do you know where they are?It’s really difficult to pick out a dress. They’re all so beautiful.I need to pick up my suit from the dry cleaners today.Teenagers never put away their clothes.Put on a coat. It’s cold.Take off that hat. It looks ridiculous.Don’t throw away clothes. Recycle them instead.
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ADVANCED GRAMMAR IN USE

ADVANCED GRAMMAR IN USE

(2)For more material and information, please visit www.tailieuduhoc.orgWe use the present perfect when we talk about something that happened in a period of time up tothe present. We use the past simple to talk about something that happened at a particular, finishedtime in the past. Compare:• Science has made many major advances this century, and• Scientists made some fundamental discoveries in the 18th century.• He puts to good use things that other people have thrown away, and• I threw away most of my old books when I moved house.When we report that someone has recently invented, produced, discovered or written somethingwe use the present perfect. When we talk about something that was invented, etc. in the moredistant past we use the past simple. Compare:• Scientist have discovered that, all over the world, millions of frogs and toads are dying.• It is often said that Hernan Cortes 'discovered' Mexico in 1519.• Two schoolchildren have invented a device for moving large objects up flights of stairs.• Chinese craftsmen invented both paper and printing.Sometimes it makes very little difference to the main sense of the sentence if we think of somethinghappening in a period of time up to the present or at a particular, finished time in the past:• The research is now complete and the experiment was {or has been) a success.• Does it concern you that you failed {or have failed) the test?• I'm sure I read {or I have read) somewhere that he died in a plane crash.We can use either the present perfect or the past simple to talk about repeated actions or events. Ifwe use the present perfect, we often suggest that the action or event might happen again.Sometimes we emphasise this with phrases such as so far and up to now (see Unit 5). If we use thepast simple, it suggests that it is finished and won't happen again. Compare:• Timson has made 13 films and I think her latest is the best, and• Timson made 13 films before she was tragically killed in a car accident.• Lee has represented his country on many occasions, and hopes to go on to compete in thenext Olympics, and
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DIFFERENT KINDS OF PHRASAL VERBS

DIFFERENT KINDS OF PHRASAL VERBS

Different kinds of phrasal verbsThere are mainly four kinds of phrasal verbs. Here is a guide to the basics of phrasal verbs.Separable and non-separable phrasal verbsPhrasal verbs are made by putting adverb particles or prepositions after verbs. Phrasal verbs made withprepositions are usually non-separable. That means the verb and the preposition always go together.We set off for the beach. (NOT We set for the beach off.)He fell off the ladder. (NOT He fell the ladder off.)Phrasal verbs made with adverb particles are usually separable. That means the particle can go before or afterthe object.I picked up the baby. OR I picked the baby up.She switched off the light. OR She switched the light off.The two parts of a separable phrasal verb are always separated when the object is a pronoun.I picked her up. (NOT I picked up her.)Phrasal Verbs which Don’t Take ObjectsPhrasal verbs which take objects are always separable. Some phrasal verbs do not take objects. These arealways inseparable.They have gotten away.The car broke down on the way to work.I get up early in the morning.How do you know whether a phrasal verb is separable or not? Well, there is no easy way of finding it out. But youcan do one thing. Use a noun or noun phrase as object and do not separate the phrasal verb. In this way, you willalways be correct.Stay on top of your writing! Download our grammar guide from www.englishgrammar.org to stay up-to-date.Powered by TCPDF (www.tcpdf.org)
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PHRASAL VERBS EXERCISE

PHRASAL VERBS EXERCISE

Phrasal verbs exerciseEach sentence given below contains an incomplete phrasal verb. Complete the expression by supplying asuitable adverb particle of preposition.1. The escaped prisoner gave himself ……………………….. when he was cornered.2. He left a letter …………………………. when he spelt his name.3. Never put ………………………….. till tomorrow what you can do today.4. We must learn to put ……………………………. with the rising prices.5. He carried ……………………………. the death wishes of his father.6. The fog passed ………………………… when the sun rose.7. We must provide …………………………… the education of our children.8. I am counting …………………………… his help and support. I just hope that he wouldn’t prove me wrong.9. One must learn to cope …………………………… failure and disappointments.10. They are looking ………………………….. a bride for their son.Answers1. The escaped prisoner gave himself up when he was cornered. (To give up is to surrender)2. He left a letter out when he spelt his name. (To leave out is to omit.)3. Never put off till tomorrow what you can do today. (To put off is to postpone.)4. We must learn to put up with the rising prices. (To put up with something is to endure without opposition.)5. He carried out the death wishes of his father. (To carry out is to accomplish or obey.)6. The fog passed off when the sun rose. (To pass off is to disappear.)7. We must provide for the education of our children. (To provide for someone is to supply their needs.)8. I am counting on his help and support.9. One must learn to cope with failure and disappointments. (Cope with = manage)10. They are looking for a bride for their son. (Look for = search for)Stay on top of your writing! Download our grammar guide from www.englishgrammar.org to stay up-to-date.Powered by TCPDF (www.tcpdf.org)
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PHRASAL VERB WITH GET

PHRASAL VERB WITH GET

các cụm động từ ( phrasal verbs) phổ biến với Get trong ôn thi đại học cao đẳng Get at : tới được, đạt đượcGet over: bình phục, hồi phụcGet on : lên ( tàu, xe…), tiến bộGet on ( well) with sb : hòa thuận với ai, quan hệ tốt với aiGet in : trúng cử, được bầu chọnGet off: xuống xe, thoát tộiGet up : thức dậyGet along ( with sb) : hòa thuận

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PHRASAL VERBS EXERCISE

PHRASAL VERBS EXERCISE

Phrasal verbs exerciseComplete the following sentences.1. The publishers are planning to bring ………………. a new edition of this book soon.a) in b) forward c) out d) off2. This scheme will eventually fall ………………..a) off b) through c) up d) out3. I can’t get on ………………….. her.a) at b) with c) by d) after4. I am looking ………………… to being a grandmother.a) at b) after c) forward d) up5. When he became a celebrity he began to look down ………………… his old friends.a) on b) upon c) at d) off6. The chief guest gave ……………………………… the prizes.a) away b) over c) to d) out7. If you don’t understand the meaning of a word, you should look it …………………. in the dictionary.a) over b) after c) up d) into8. Everyone in my family looks up ………………… my grandfather.a) to b) at c) down d) after9. The rope gave …………………..a) away b) way c) up d) in10. We will not put ………………. with such an insult.a) out b) away c) up d) offAnswers1. The publishers are planning to bring out a new edition of this book soon.2. This scheme will eventually fall through. (To fall through is to fail.)3. I can’t get on with her.4. I am looking forward to being a grandmother.5. When he became a celebrity he began to look down upon his old friends.
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CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH ADVANCED GRAMMAR IN USE

CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH ADVANCED GRAMMAR IN USE

CONTENTS Thanks vii To the student viii To the teacher ix Tenses 1 Present simple (I do) and present continuous (I am doing) (1) 2 Present simple (I do) and present continuous (I am doing) (2) 3 Present perfect (I have done) and past simple (I did) (1) 4 Present perfect (I have done) and past simple (I did) (2) 5 Present perfect (I have done) and past simple (I did) (3): adverbs used with these tenses 6 Past continuous (I was doing) and past simple (I did) 7 Present perfect continuous (I have been doing) 8 Present perfect continuous (I have been doing) and present perfect (I have done) 9 Past perfect (I had done) and past simple (I did) 10 Past perfect continuous (I had been doing) and past perfect (I had done) The future 11 Will and going to; shall 12 Present continuous (I am doing) for the future and going to 13 Present simple (I do) for the future 14 Future continuous (will be doing) 15 Be to + infinitive (I am to do), future perfect (I will have done), and future perfect continuous (I will have been doing) 16 The future seen from the past (was going to, etc.) Modals 17 Should and ought to 18 Will and would: willingness, likelihood and certainty 19 Will and would: habits; used to 20 May, might, can and could: possibility (1) 21 May, might, can and could: possibility (2) 22 Can, could, and be able to: ability 23 Must and have (got) to 24 Need(n''t), don''t have to and mustn''t 25 Permission, offers, etc. Be, have, do, make, etc. 26 Linking verbs: be, appear, seem; become, get, etc. 27 Have and have got; have and take 28 Do and make Passives 29 Forming passive sentences 30 Using passives 31 Verb + -ing or to-infinitive: passive forms 32 Reporting with passive verbs Questions 33 Forming questions; reporting questions 34 Asking and answering negative questions 35 Wh-questions with how, what, which and who Verbs: infinitives, -ing forms, etc. 36 Verbs with and without objects 37 Verb + to-infinitive or bare infinitive 38 Verb + to-infinitive or -ing? 39 Verb + -ing 40 Verb + wh-clause 41 Have/get something done; want something done, etc. 42 Verb + two objects Reporting 43 Reporting people''s words and thoughts 44 Reporting statements (1): that-clauses 45 Reporting statements (2): verb tense in that-clauses 46 Reporting statements (3): verb tense in the reporting clause; say and tell; etc. 47 Reporting offers, suggestions, orders, intentions, etc. 48 Should in that-clauses 49 Modal verbs in reporting Nouns and compounds 50 Countable and uncountable nouns 51 Agreement between subject and verb (1) 52 Agreement between subject and verb (2) 53 The possessive form of nouns (Jane''s mother) 54 Compound nouns (1) 55 Compound nouns (2) Articles 56 A/an and one 57 The and a/an (1):''the only one'' 58 The and a/an (2): ''things already known'', etc. 59 Some and zero article with plural and uncountable nouns 60 The, zero article and a/an: ''things in general'' 61 People and places 62 Holidays, times of the day, meals, etc. Determiners and quantifiers 63 Some and any; something, somebody, etc. 64 Much (of), many (of), a lot of, lots (of), etc. 65 All (of), the whole (of), both (of) 66 Each (of), every, and all 67 No, none (of), and not any 68 Few, a few (of), little, a little (of), etc. 69 Quantifiers with and without ''of (some/some of; any/any of; etc.) Relative clauses and other types of clause 70 Relative clauses (1) (The girl who I was talking about.) 71 Relative clauses (2) (Tom, who is only six, can speak three languages.) 72 Relative clauses (3): other relative pronouns 73 Relative clauses (4): prepositions in relative clauses 74 Participle clauses (-ing, -ed and being + -ed) 75 Participle clauses with adverbial meaning IV Pronouns, substitution and leaving out words 76 Reflexive pronouns: herself, himself, themselves, etc. 77 One and ones (There''s my car - the green one.) 78 So (I think so; so I hear) 79 Do so; such 80 Leaving out words after auxiliary verbs 81 Leaving out to-infinitives (She didn''t want to (go).) Adjectives 82 Adjectives: position (1) 83 Gradable and ungradable adjectives; position (2) 84 Adjectives and adverbs 85 Participle adjectives (the losing ticket; the selected winners) 86 Prepositions after adjectives: afraid of/for, etc. 87 Adjectives + that-clause or to-infinitive 88 Comparison with adjectives (1): -er/more...; enough, sufficiently, too; etc. 89 Comparison with adjectives (2): as...as; so...as to; etc. Adverbs and conjunctions 90 Position of adverbs 91 Adverbs of place, indefinite frequency, and time 92 Degree adverbs: very, too, extremely, quite, etc. 93 Comment adverbs; viewpoint adverbs; focus adverbs 94 Adverbial clauses of time (1): verb tense; before and until; hardly, etc. 95 Adverbial clauses of time (2): as, when and while 96 Giving reasons: as, because, because of, etc.; for and with 97 Purposes and results: in order to, so as to, etc. 98 Contrasts: although and though; even though/if; in spite of and despite 99 Conditional sentences (1): verb tenses 100 Conditional sentences (2) 101 If...not and unless; if and whether, etc. 102 After waiting..., before leaving..., besides owning..., etc. 103 Connecting ideas between and within sentences Prepositions 104 At, in and on: prepositions of place 105 Across, along, over and through; above, over, below and under 106 Between, among; by, beside, etc. 107 At, in and on: prepositions of time 108 During, for, in, over, and throughout; by and until 109 Except (for), besides, apart from and but for 110 About and on; by and with 111 Prepositions after verbs (1) 112 Prepositions after verbs (2) 113 Prepositions after verbs (3) 114 Two- and three-word verbs: word order Organising information 115 There is, there was, etc. 116 It... (1) 117 It... (2) 118 Focusing: it-clauses and what-clauses 119 Inversion (1) 120 Inversion (2) Appendix 1 Passive verb forms 242 Appendix 2 Quoting what people think or what they have said 243 Appendix 3 Irregular verbs 244 Appendix 4 Typical errors and corrections 246 Glossary 265 Additional exercises 269 Study guide 280 Key to exercises 289 Key to Additional exercises 325 Key to Study guide 329 Index 330 VI THANKS Many people have contributed in a variety of ways in the preparation of this book. At Cambridge University Press I would like to thank Alison Sharpe, Barbara Thomas and Geraldine Mark, all of whom have brought their professionalism and expertise to guiding and shaping the book in its various stages. My special thanks are due to Jeanne McCarten, not only for comments on early drafts, but for her constant support and encouragement. Thanks also to Peter Ducker for the design, and to Peter Elliot and Amanda MacPhail for the illustrations. For providing a stimulating working environment, I would like to thank former colleagues at the Learning Assistance Centre, University of Sydney, where the writing began in earnest, and present colleagues at the English for International Students Unit, the University of Birmingham, where the project was completed. Many of my students at the University of Birmingham have worked on versions of the material and I wish to thank in particular students on the Japanese Secondary School Teachers'' course between 1995 and 1998 who carefully and constructively evaluated sections of the work. I would also like to thank the students and staff at the institutions all over the world where the material was piloted. Gerry Abbot, Annie Broadhead, David Crystal, Hugh Leburn, Laura Matthews, Michael McCarthy, Stuart Redman and Anna Sikorzynaska made extensive comments on the manuscript. I hope I have been able to reflect their many valuable suggestions in the finished book. At home, Ann, Suzanne and David have all had a part to play in giving me time to write the book, motivation, and examples. VII TO THE STUDENT Who the book is for The book is intended for more advanced students of English. It is written mainly as a self-study book, but might also be used in class with a teacher. It revises some of the more difficult points of grammar that you will have already studied - such as when to use the, a/an or no article, and when to use the past simple or the present perfect - but will also introduce you to many more features of English grammar appropriate to an advanced level of study. How the book is organised There are 120 units in the book. Each one looks at a particular area of grammar. Some sections within each unit focus on the use of a grammatical pattern, such as will be + -ing (as in will be travelling). Others explore grammatical contrasts, such as whether to use would or used to to report past events, or when we use because or because of. The 120 units are grouped under a number of headings such as Tenses and Modals. You can find details of this in the Contents on pp. iii-vi. Each unit consists of two pages. On the left-hand page are explanations and examples; on the right are practice exercises. The letters next to each exercise show you which sections of the lefthand page you need to understand to do that exercise. You can check your answers in the Key on page 289. The Key also comments on some of the answers. Four Appendices tell you about passive verb form, quotation, irregular verbs and Typical Errors (see below). To help you find the information you need there is an Index at the back of the book. Although terms to describe grammar have been kept to a minimum some have been included, and you can find explanations of these terms in the Glossary on page 265. л On each left-hand page you will find a number of • symbols. These are included to show the kinds of mistakes that students often make concerning the grammar point being explained. These Typical Errors are given in Appendix 4 on page 246, together with a correction of the error, and an explanation where it is helpful. The symbol Й?я is used to show you when it might be useful to consult a dictionary. On the explanation pages it is placed next to lists of words that follow a particular grammatical pattern, and on the exercise pages it is used, for example, to show where it necessary to understand what particular words mean in order to do the exercise. Good English-English dictionaries include the Cambridge International Dictionary of English, the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, the Oxford Advanced Learner''s Dictionary, and the Collins Cobuild English Language Dictionary. How to use the book It is not necessary to work through the units in order. If you know what grammar points you have difficulty with, go straight to the units that deal with them. You can use the Index to help you find the relevant unit or units. If you are unsure which units to study, use the Study Guide on page 280. You can use the units in a number of ways. You might study the explanation and examples first, do the exercises on the opposite page, check your answers in the key, and then look again at the explanations if you made any mistakes. If you just want to revise a grammar point you think you already know, you could do the exercises first and then study the explanations for any you got wrong. You might of course simply use the book as a reference book without doing the exercises. A number of Additional Exercises are included for further practice of particular areas of grammar. VIII TO THE TEACHER Advanced Grammar in Use was written as a self-study grammar book but teachers might also find it useful for supplementing or supporting their classroom teaching. The book will probably be most useful for more advanced level students for reference and practice. Students at these levels will have covered many of the grammar points before, and some of the explanations and practice exercises will provide revision material. However, all units are likely to contain information that is new for students even at advanced level, and many of the uses of particular grammatical patterns and contrasts between different forms will not have been studied before. No attempt has been made to grade the units according to level of difficulty. Instead you should select units as they are relevant to the syllabus that you are following with your students, or as particular difficulties arise. There are many ways in which you might use the book with a class. You might, for example, use explanations and exercises on the left-hand pages as sources of ideas on which you can base the presentation of grammar patterns and contrasts, and use the exercises for classroom practice or set them as consolidation material for self-study. The left-hand pages can then be a resource for future reference and revision by students. You might alternatively want to begin with the exercises and refer to the left-hand page only when students are having problems. You could also set particular units or groups of units (such as those on Articles or The future) for self-study if individual students are having difficulties. n The Typical Errors in each unit (indicated with a* symbol and listed in Appendix 4 on page 246) can be discussed with students either before the explanations and examples have been studied, in order to focus attention on the problem to be looked at in that part of the unit, or after they have been studied, as consolidation. For example, before studying a particular unit you could write the typical error(s) for that unit on the board and ask students: "What''s wrong and how would you correct it?" There is a set of Additional Exercises (page 269), most of which can be used to provide practice of grammar points from a number of different units. A ''classroom edition'' of Advanced Grammar in Use is also available. It has no key and some teachers might prefer to use it with their students. ix Advanced Grammar in Use rreseni simple ^i аи; anu (I am doing) (1) иимшшииь We use the present simple to describe things that are always true, or situations that exist now and, as far as we know, will go on indefinitely: • It takes me five minutes to get to school. • Trees grow more quickly in summer than in winter. • Liz plays the violin brilliantly. To talk about particular actions or events that have begun but have not ended at the time of speaking, we use the present continuous: • The car isn''t starting again. • ''Who are you phoning?'' ''I''m trying to get through to Joan.'' • The shop is so inefficient that many customers are taking their business elsewhere. We often use time expressions such as at the moment, at present, currently, just, and still to emphasise that the action or event is happening now: • ''Have you done the shopping?'' Tm just going.'' Notice that the action or event may not be going on at the time of speaking: • The police are talking to a number of people about the robbery. We use the present simple to talk about habits or things that happen on a regular basis: • I leave work at 5.30 most days. • Each July we go to Turkey for a holiday. However, when we describe repeated actions or events that are happening at or around the time of speaking, we use the present continuous: • Why are you jumping up and down? • I''m hearing a lot of good reports about your work these days. We can use the present continuous or the present simple to describe something that we regularly do at a particular time. Compare: • We usually watch the news on TV at 9.00. (= we start watching at 9.00) • We''re usually watching the news on TV at 9.00. (= we''re already watching at 9.00) We use the present continuous to imply that a situation is or may be temporary. Compare: • Banks lend money to make a profit, (this is what usually happens) • Banks are lending more money (these days) to encourage businesses to expand, (implies a temporary arrangement) • She teaches Maths in a school in Bonn, (a permanent arrangement) • She''s teaching Maths in a school in Bonn, (implies that this is not, or may not be, permanent) We often use the present simple with verbs that perform the action they describe: • I admit I can''t see as well as I used to. (= an admission) • I refuse to believe that he didn''t know the car was stolen. (= a refusal) Other verbs like this (sometimes called performative verbs) include accept, acknowledge, advise, apologise, assume, deny, guarantee, hope, inform, predict, promise, recommend, suggest, suppose, warn. We can use modals with performative verbs to make what we say more tentative or polite:. • I would advise you to arrive two hours before the flight leaves. • I''m afraid I have to inform you that your application for funding has been turned down....
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21842 HAVE HAS GRAMMARGUIDE

21842 HAVE HAS GRAMMARGUIDE

Have (got) – I, you, we, theyHas (got) – he, she, itIn Past:Had - I, you, we, they, he, she, it I have got a car.He has got a bike.-I have not got a car.He has not got a bike.I have no car.? Have you got a car? Yes, I have. No, I have not (haven’t).Has he got a car? Yes, he has. No, he has not (hasn’t).or I have a car.He has a bike.-I do not have a car.He does not have a bike.? Do you have a car? Yes, I do. No, I do not (don’t).Does he have a car? Yes, he does. No, he does not (doesn’t).Phrasal verbs:To have tea (coffee)To have breakfastTo have lunch

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NGỮ PHÁP TIẾNG ANH - BÀI TẬP PHRASAL VERBS

NGỮ PHÁP TIẾNG ANH - BÀI TẬP PHRASAL VERBS

Ngữ pháp tiếng anh - Bài tập phrasal verbs

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PHRASAL VERBS WITH CALL

PHRASAL VERBS WITH CALL

Phrasal verbs with callEach sentence given below contains an incomplete phrasal verb. Complete the expression by supplying asuitable particle or preposition.1. He is not in at the moment. I will ask him to call you ………………….. as soon as he arrives.a) inb) backc) out2. Jessica called …………………… yesterday when I was working in the garage.a) backb) inc) ford) out3. If you are not feeling well, I will call ……………….. a doctor.a) outb) inc) for4. When the situation got out of hand, we had to call ……………………. the police.a) forb) inc) back5. They have called ……………………… the wedding.a) forb) offc) in6. I called ……………………. his name, but there was no answer.a) inb) outc) for7. Call me …………………. when you reach there.a) inb) up
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PHRASAL VERBS EXERCISE

PHRASAL VERBS EXERCISE

b) inc) off10. Armed men held …………………………… the bank yesterday.a) upb) offc) inAnswers1. The terrorists had planned to blow up the palace.2. I didn’t like it when she brought up the matter of divorce all over again.3. He was brought up by his uncle.4. I wish they would call the meeting off.5. She asked me to do the job over.6. We will have to find out who the real culprit is.7. The book store is giving away used books.8. When are you going to give me my money back?9. The students have handed in their work.10. Armed men held up the bank yesterday.Stay on top of your writing! Download our grammar guide from www.englishgrammar.org to stay up-to-date.Powered by TCPDF (www.tcpdf.org)
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INSEPARABLE PHRASAL VERBS

INSEPARABLE PHRASAL VERBS

Inseparable phrasal verbsThe two parts of an inseparable phrasal verb always remain together. Phrasal verbs made with prepositions areusually inseparable. Examples of inseparable phrasal verbs are: fall off, splash out, scrap by, dip into, breakintoetc.He fell off the bridge. (NOT He fell the bridge off.)Fall offis an inseparable phrasal verb. Therefore the two parts remain together.They broke into the room by force. (NOT They broke the room into by force.)She broke into tears. (NOT She broke tears into.)He dipped into his pocket. (NOT He dipped his pocket into.)Average students often find it hard to pull through the examination. (NOT Average students often find ithard to pull the examination through.)Verbs with prepositions and particles together Some verbs can be used with both an adverb particle and apreposition. Examples are: get on with, put up with, look down upon and look out for. Note that all of thesethree-word phrasal verbs are inseparable.He gets on with his mother-in-law well.I can no longer put up with this.Don’t look down upon the poor.It is not easy to know whether a phrasal verb is separable or not. If you are not sure always use a noun as theobject and do not separate.Stay on top of your writing! Download our grammar guide from www.englishgrammar.org to stay up-to-date.Powered by TCPDF (www.tcpdf.org)
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CAC CUM DONG TU THI THPT QUOC GIA PHRASAL VERB

CAC CUM DONG TU THI THPT QUOC GIA PHRASAL VERB

let off, 13let out, 7let up, 24lie around, 20lift up, 18light up, 13lighten up, 25line up, 18live with. 35lock in, 30lock out, 30lock up, 44look around, 21look at, 5look down on, 48look for, 1look forward to, 3look into, 31look out, 29look over, 21look up, 4look up to, 48luck out, 29make for, 46make of, 35make out, 29make up, 23mess up, 28mix up, 44monkey around

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ON HOC SINH GIOI TIENG ANH THCS TRON BO

ON HOC SINH GIOI TIENG ANH THCS TRON BO

(Eye-shade/ Eyeglass/ Eyepiece/ Eye chart) is used to check one’s eyesight.Leave the victim lying flat and don’t let him (to become/ become/ becomes/ becoming) chilled.Milk (brings/ is bringing/ is brought/ has brought) to the houses by the milkman everyday.We are delighted (getting/ to get/ get/ got) your letter last week.“Would you like to go to the movies tonight?” –“I’m sorry, I can’t. I (am doing/ do/ will do/ did) my homework this evening.92. Milk bottles can be (recycled/ thrown away/ broken/ reused) after being cleaned.93. This project (is carried out/ will carry out/ carried out/ will be carried out) next month.94. It’s dangerous (swim/ to swim/ swimming/ swam) in this river.95. We are looking forward to (seeing/ see/ saw/ being seen) you in June.96. It’s too cold outside. (Would you like to shut the windows/ Will you shut the windows/ Shall I shut thewindows/ Can I shut the windows)? - Sure. I’ll do it right now.97. I can see a boy (ride/ riding/ to ride/ rode) a water buffalo.98. It’s (interesting/ interested/ interestingly/ interestedly) to travel around Vietnam.99. Would you mind (to close/ closing/ close/ closed) the window?100. She cried (exciting/ excitingly/ excited/ excitedly) when she heard that news.101. (Could/ Don’t/ Do/ Would) you mind if I smoke?102. My sister likes sweets (making/ made/ to make/ make) from chocolate.103. This is the first time Sharron (is seeing/ saw/ see/ has seen) rice paddies.104. There are flights daily to Ho Chi Minh City (besides/ after/ except/ in) Monday.105. When we were in Italy, we spent a few days (at/ on/ in/ to) Venice.106. They are good friends. They (know/ have known/ knew/ were knowing) each other for a long time.107. How about (going/ to go/ go/ gone) to Dong Xuan market?108. “What (the weather like/ does the weather like/ the weather is like/ is the weather like) in New York?”- “It’s very cold and humid”109. “(Do you want/ Would you mind/ Would you like/ Could you please) to come and have dinner with us?”- “I’d love to but I’m busy”.110. Can you tell me where (she does/ does she / she is/ is she)?111. I was reading (when/ while/ at which/ at time) my sisters were playing with their dolls.112. Ann didn’t see me wave her. She (is looking/ looked/ looks/ was looking) in the other direction.
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